“The ideal place for me is the one in which it is most natural to…”

“The ideal place for me is the one in which it is most natural to live as a foreigner.”

-Italo Calvino

Promenade, copyright 2017, Douglas Moorezart, all rights reserved

 

 

Advertisements

“a world where there are Octobers”

 

Through The Island Forest
Through The Island Forest by Douglas MooreZart – copyright 2016, all rights reserved. Original Fine Art Prints By Douglas MooreZart

 


“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”

L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables


In the mountains of southern California there is a lake with an island in its midst. Outside this island a majority of trees were consumed in a forest fire in 2003 (The infamous Cedar Fire).   Many of the trees had stood 200-300 or more years. But on the lake’s island you can still walk through a landscape of beautiful ancient oak and pine trees. On a fall day, as I walked the island’s edges, I came upon this spot-  a still standing glorious ancient survivor.  Autumn perfection – Fall color surrounds, the air is crisp and clear, migratory birds call above and the sun rests on the horizon.

“We need time to lose interest in things.”

“She told him she liked the idea of slowness in general.  So many things go so fast, she said.  We need time to lose interest in things.”

— Don DeLillo, Point Omega

Coming Going – D.Moorezart, c 2017, all rights reserved

“Coming Going” – photography, Douglas Moorezart, c 2017, all rights reserved.

“It is always our conscious choice which secret garden we will tend”

“Both abundance and lack exist simultaneously in our lives, as parallel realities. It is always our conscious choice which secret garden we will tend”

Sarah Ban Breathnach

Within our garden in the high mountains of New Mexico is a 150 year old Pinyon tree.  Our first few years here we made a twice daily pilgrimage to sit beneath this beautiful tree — folding chair in one hand, espresso in the other.

We end up here in time to see the sun rise and the night’s mist vanish.  And in book-end symmetry at sunset we sit silent observers of the distant mountains set beneath an O’Keeffe sky of crimson, orange and purple.

One day a question arrived.  How about more permanent ‘season ticket seating’?  How about an old-fashioned tree swing? How about that branch there?  But it’s old like us and might break. Perhaps an arbor to support it – a little insurance.

Arbor done, swing hung, but something was missing. It needs some color doesn’t it?  Many colors had potential. All were considered and it took some time to settle on just one. The final choice of vibrant yellow worked perfectly, poetically.

All elements in balance now and for 310 days a year (give or take), this swing seems to levitate in the rising and setting sun, like a magic carpet….two performances daily.


The Yellow Swing - Douglas MooreZart - Fine Art Prints
The Yellow Swing – photography by  Douglas MooreZart – Fine Art Prints

 

 


 

Emerald Twilight: “Take only memories, leave nothing but footprints.”

Emerald Twilight - mixed media, copyright 2017, all rights reserved, Douglas Moorezart
Emerald Twilight – mixed media, copyright 2017, all rights reserved, Douglas Moorezart

Prints available here


 

“Take only memories,
leave nothing but footprints.”

-Chief Seattle

 


“without perfume yet red as a rose”

 

In my New Mexico home the wildflower known as Indian Paintbrush found just the right conditions to take up residence. It’s no easy feat to cultivate the growth of this wild scarlet and orange flower that, in fact, does resemble a free-form paintbrush. Good luck propagating this flower. Seeds are available commercially but it is anything but guaranteed to succeed.

It has very specific requirements and is a true wildflower requiring no human intervention to grow where it wills. Transplanting an Indian Paintbrush does not work as it is a parasitic plant attaching its roots to the roots of other plants and deriving water from them. So it was to my amazement that my specimens spread prolifically all over my land, increasing its range each year.  Here is one of several artworks I’ve created on this unique, complex and truly wild botanical wonder!

paintbrush final 72 res
Indian Paintbrush, mixed media, copyright 2014, Douglas Moorezart, all rights reserved

There are multiple legends about the origins of this remarkable beauty. One such legend is shared in Tomie dePaola’s children’s book the…

…’Legend of the Indian Paintbrush“.  This is the story of a young Indian boy who did not fit in his society’s assigned role as warrior. Today I suppose he would be labeled “special needs“.  Eventually, he finds his place as an artist. (Hooray for that!)  And as you might guess, this eventually leads to the origin of the Indian Paintbrush flower. But I’m not giving away the punchline! Here is a 5 minute version of the story by Tomie dePaola:


This striking perennial is honored by poet A.V. Hudson,

 

“A strange little flower with a sun-kissed nose,

without perfume yet red as a rose.

Did some Indian maiden plant you here

in the footprint left by the hoof of a deer?”

 

” Will it be here… a place which will not elude us ? “

On the Edge – original photography by Douglas Moorezart, copyright 2017, all rights reserved

“Will it be here that we shall find a place
which will not elude us, or which if it remains
does not exert on us a culpable attraction?

Or must we, leaning over the deck and
watching the shores glide by,
move forever onward?”

― André Gide, Urien’s Voyage